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Jacques Futrelle


Jacques FutrelleJacques Heath Futrelle (1875 – April 15, 1912) was an American journalist and mystery writer. He is best known for writing short detective stories featuring Professor Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen, also known as “The Thinking Machine” for his application of logic to any and all situations. Futrelle was one of the most popular authors of the early years of the 20th century, but tragically died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic. None of his eight novels are impossible crime or locked room mysteries. They are far better classified as romantic melodramas. Instead, it is only in his ‘Thinking Man’ short stories that locked room and impossible crime fans find some of the best material in the sub-genera.

More On Jacques Futrelle – Wikipedia & Gadetection & More


A Jacques Futrelle ‘Thinking Machine’ bibliography


If you are a fan of  Jacque Futrelle’s ‘Thinking Machine’ stories, chances are you are often frustrated by the number of duplicate titles often used for the same story. These stories appeared rather haphazardly in several early editions, with most of the stories included in two collections, ‘The Thinking Machine’ (1907), and ‘The Thinking Machine on The Case’ (1908). However, so many different editions have since been published under the title ‘The Thinking Machine”, each a slightly different collection, that it is now necessary to first create a definitive bibliography of Futrelle’s ‘Thinking Man’ stories. My research shows that there are a total of 51 short stories, plus ‘The Chase of the Golden Plate’, a ‘Thinking Machine’ novella. This total counts ‘Dressing Room A’ as two separate stories: ‘The Thinking Machine’ and ‘The First Problem’ – as they were originally published. The same condition applies to ‘The Jackdaw’ and ‘The Knotted Cord’, which are often published together, but should be correctly treated as separate stories. All dates are approximate. Those few first stories written in 1905, and those released after Futrelle’s death, are correct, but it is virtually impossible to determine which of the other 45 stories were written in 1906, and which were written in 1907.

Novella: The Chase of the Golden Plate (1906)

The Thinking Machine (1905)  AKA: Dressing Room A – Part 1  / The Thinking Man Investigates  
The First Problem  (1905) AKA: Dressing Room A – Part 2    
My First Experience with the Great Logician  (1905)  AKA: The Leak   
The Problem of Cell 13 (1905)  
Kidnapped Baby Blake, Millionaire (1905) AKA: The Disappearance of Baby Blake   
The Mystery of The Grip of Death (1906)  AKA: The Case of The Mysterious Weapon
The (Problem of the) Hidden Million  (1906)   
The Ralston Bank Burglary (1906)    
The (Problem of the) Auto Cab (1906)  
The Roswell Tiara (1906)   
The Crystal Gazer (1906)   
The Superfluous Finger (1906)  
The (Problem of the) Cross Mark (1906)  
The Missing Necklace (1906)   
The Lost Radium (1906)   
The (Problem of the) Red Rose (1906)  
“The Grinning God (1906)   
The Fatal Cipher (1906)    
His Perfect Alibi (1906)  
The Haunted Bell (1906)   
The Silver Box (1907) (AKA: The Leak)
The(Problem of the) Brown Coat (1907)  
The (Problem of the) Stolen Rubens (1907)   
The Motor Boat (1907)  
The (Problem of the) Broken Bracelet (1907)  
The Phantom Motor (1907)   
The Man Who Was Lost (1907)  
A Piece of String (1907)   
The (Problem of the) Deserted House (1907)   
The Scarlet Thread (1907)

The Flaming Phantom (1907)  
The Mystery of The Golden Dagger(1907)  
(The Problem of) Convict #97 (1907)  
The (Problem of the) Souvenir Cards (1907)
The Ghost Woman (1907)   AKA: The Stolen Banknotes   
The Great Auto Mystery (1907) 
The Jackdaw Girl (1907)   AKA: The Jackdaw (Part 1)
The Knotted Cord (1907)   AKA: Part 2 0f ‘The Jackdaw”
The Organ Grinder (1907)   
The Private Compartment (1907)  
The Mystery of the Studio (1907)    
The Three Overcoats (1907)  
The Vanishing Man (1907)  
The Green-Eyed Monster (1907)  
The Interrupted Wireless (1907)  
An Opera Box (1907)  
The Mystery of Room 666 (1907)  
Prince Otto (1907)  AKA: Five Millions by Wireless  
The Yellow Diamond Pendant (1907?)

The Case of the Scientific Murderer (1912)  
The Case (or Tragedy) of the Life Raft (1912)

Notes: ‘The Leak’ is a title that has been applied to both ‘My First Experience with the Great Logician’ and more properly to ‘The Silver Box’ – which deals with an information leak. ‘The Mystery of Room 666’ & ‘The Problem of The Brown Coat’ are generally quite hard to find, while ‘The Yellow Diamond Pendant’ is not found in any current edition.

Notes: re ‘Futrelle Megapak’ – 6 missing stories:

Locked Room:
“The(Problem of the) Brown Coat”
“The (Problem of the) Stolen Rubens”  (Available on Futrelle.com)

Not Locked Room:
“The Motor Boat” (Available on Futrelle.com)
“The Mystery of Room 666”
“Prince Otto”  AKA: “Five Millions by Wireless” (1912)  (Available on Futrelle.com)
“The Yellow Diamond Pendant”


Jacques Futrelle Short Stories Collections


Van Dusen 50Professor Van Dusen, M. D.: The Thinking Machine (50 short story collection)
Jacques Futrelle 
Detective: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen AKA: The Thinking Machine

Available only in ebook edition.

eBook   Amazon.ca

Note: The only ‘complete’ collection, missing only the ‘The Yellow Diamond Pendant’ – which may now be lost! The other common eBook the ‘Futrelle Megapak’ misses 6 stories including two locked room titles. (see notes above)


Thinking ManMystery and Detection with the Thinking Machine, Vol. 1 / Vol. 2
Jacques Futrelle
Detective: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen AKA: The Thinking Machine

Available only in paperback edition.

Volume 1   Volume 2   Amazon.ca  1  2

Note: The best paperback collection: 48 Thinking Man Stories. Missing only the three hard to find stories, The Mystery of Room 666, The Problem of The Brown Coat, and The Yellow Diamond Pendant.


Futrelle stories free on line at futrelle.com


Jacques Futrelle Locked Room Short Stories


Dressing Room A (1905)
AKA: The First Problem, The Thinking Machine, The Thinking Machine Investigates (see note)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

Best Review

***

Available in paperback, ebook, and audible editions.

Audible  LibriVox

Note: The most confusing title

A beautiful actress mysteriously disappears from her backstage dressing room in the middle of a production of  ‘As You Like It’, and cannot be found either dead or alive – even though all the exits were guarded and a search of the premises was conducted. 

This is definitely the most confusing title in this series. It consists of a very short first part, where Van Dusen earns his ‘Thinking Machine’ title by beating 25 chess masters – just after learning the rules! This may be offered as the first section of ‘Dressing Room A’, ”The Thinking Machine’, or ‘The Thinking Machine Investigates’ and has no locked room or impossible crime element. However, the second part of ‘Dressing Room A’, also known as ‘The First Problem’, is essentially a locked room story, though not included in the two standard bibliographies. The only possible excuse for this admission is that the solution proves it was never really a locked room – but that is true of a vast majority of locked room tales. These stories are all about the illusion of a locked room – which is certainly true in this case. I will therefore add it to the list, even though it is certainly not one of the best.


Cell 13 (1905)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

Best Review

*****

Available in paperback, ebook, and audible editions.

Audible  Librivox

Note: The Most famous ‘Thinking Machine’ story!

Like all of Futrelle’s short stories, “The Problem of Cell 13″ features Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen, AKA: ‘The Thinking Machine’, as the protagonist, though most of the story is viewed from the perspective of the prison warden. While in a debate with two friends, Dr. Charles Ransome and Alfred Fielding,”The Thinking Machine” insists that nothing is impossible when the human mind is properly applied. To prove his point, he agrees to an odd experiment. He will be incarcerated on death row in a local prison for one week, and accepts the challenge of escaping prior to a planned reunion. Van Dusen wins the day by devising an ingenious scheme, eventually aided by his frequent assistant, newspaper reporter Hutchinson Hatch. The whole story is full of red herrings designed to carefully conceal his brilliant plan. 

This is the most famous ‘Thinking Machine’ story, which appears in numerous anthologies,  and is one of the truly great great locked room puzzles. First collected in ‘The Thinking Machine’ (1907). This story was selected by science fiction author Harlan Ellison for Lawrence Block’s ‘Best Mysteries of the Century’.

More on ‘Cell 13’


The Flaming Phantom (1905)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: A flaming phantom writes messages in the air!

An apparently indestructible flaming phantom appears in a haunted house. “O’Heagan told it. He, too, had sought to get hold of the flaming figure. As he ran for it, it disappeared, was obliterated, wiped out, gone, and he found himself groping in the darkness of the room beyond, the library. Like Hatch, he took the nearest way out, which happened to be through a window already smashed.”

A good examples of Futrelle’s art, a clearly impossible vision that turns out to have a rational and believable, if slightly convoluted, explanation.


Kidnapped Baby Blake, Millionaire (1905)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review 

*****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: A baby vanishes into thin air!

 “What he saw was the footprint of a child—a baby. The tracks led straight away through the snow toward the back wall, and without a word the two men followed them, one by one; the regular toddling steps of a baby who is only fairly certain of his feet. Ten, twenty, thirty feet they went on in a straight line and already the detectives saw a possible solution. It was that Baby Blake had wandered away of his own free will.
Then, as they were following the tracks, they stopped suddenly astounded. Each dropped on his knees in the snow and sought vainly for something sought over a space of many feet, then turned back to the tracks again.
“Well, if that–” one began.
The footprints, going steadily forward across the yard, had stopped. There was the last, made as if Baby Blake had intended to go forward, but there were no more tracks – no more traces of tracks – nothing. Baby Blake had walked to this point, and then –
“Why he must have gone straight up in the air,” gasped one of the detectives. He sank down on a small wooden box three or four feet from where the tracks ended, and wiped the perspiration from his face.”


The Crystal Gazer (1906)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

Best Review

****

Available in paperback, ebook, and audible editions.

LibriVox

Note: A vision of the future?

An indian seer allows an  American traveller, Varick, to peer into his crystal. Varick sees himself in his own room, then watches as a man enters and stabs him with a dagger in the back. The Thinking Machine is not so easily convinced!


The Roswell Tiara (1906)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: A single diamond stolen from a tiara

“Briefly,” said Mrs. Roswell, “it has to do with the disappearance of a single small gem from a diamond tiara which I had locked in a vault—a vault of which no living person knew the combination except myself. Because of family reasons I could not go to the police, and -”

Only two women had access to this locked room and only one knew the combination – but the contents of the safe were still strewn across the floor – including the tiara – with a single missing stone!


Lost Radium (1906)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

Best Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: The disappearing radium!

“Again there was a long pause. Ahead of him, with this hitherto unheard of quantity of radium available, Professor Dexter saw rosy possibilities in his chosen work. The thought gripped him more firmly as he considered it. He could see little chance of a purchase–but the use of the substance during his experiments That might be arranged.”

One of the more amusing Futrelle stories, with a pretty good solution. The radium goes missing from a locked and guarded laboratory where no one could have been present!


The Missing Necklace (1906)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

*****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: The only solution!

A valuable necklace is stolen from Lady Varron at a reception for the US Ambassador, and Scotland Yard’s Inspector Conway is determined to return the pearls and defeat Leighton, a well known thief who has long flaunted his crimes in the face of the Yard. When Leighton heads to America, Conway is certain that he has the jewels with him, but when the customs search comes up empty he turns to the ‘Thinking Machine’.  The Thinking Machine solves the case by finding the only possible method to transfer the pearls ashore. 

“It was all ridiculously simple,” began the scientist at last in explanation. “It came down to this: How could one hundred and seventy-two pearls be transferred from a boat forty miles at sea to a safe place ashore? The motor boat did not speak or approach any other vessel; obviously one could not throw them ashore and I have never heard of such a thing as a trained fish which might have brought them in. Now what are the only other ways they could have reached shore with comparative safety?”
He looked from one to another inquiringly.”


His Perfect Alibi (1906)
AKA: The Problem of The Perfect Alibi
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: An almost perfect crime?

“Next morning at eight o’clock, Paul Randolph De Forrest, a young man of some social prominence, was found murdered in the sitting room of his suite in the big Avon apartment house. He had been dead for several hours. He sat beside his desk, and death left him sprawled upon it face downward. The weapon was one of several curious daggers which had been used ornamentally on the walls of his apartments…”

Beneath his body, on the desk, lay a sheet of paper on which were scrawled a few words; a pencil was clutched tightly in his right hand. The detective glanced then stared at the paper; it startled him. In the scrawly, trembling, incoherent handwriting of the dying man were these disjointed sentences and words:
“Murdered **** Franklin Chase **** quarrel **** stabbed me **** am dying **** God help me **** clock striking 2 **** good-bye.” The detective’s jaws snapped as he read. Here was crime, motive and time.”

The only problem is that the accused, at this exact hour, was several miles away having emergency dental treatment!


The Grinning God (1906)
AKA: Part I: Wraiths of the Storm by Mrs. Jacques Futrelle / Part II: The House That Was by Jacques Futrelle
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

Best Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: An unusual collaboration!

This story is the result of a very unusual collaboration between Mrs. Jacques Futrelle and her husband.  It is unusual in the sense that the first installment, “Wraiths of the Storm,” presents a most impossible problem and is entirely the work of Mrs. Futrelle – while the second installment, “The House That Was,” is Futrelle’s response to this real challenge, in which the ‘Thinking Machine’ solves all the problems his wife had independently invented.

A traveller named Fairbanks takes a wrong turn and his chased by a storm to a mysterious house on a road that does not seem to appear on any map. The man who lives in the house is “tall, angular, aged, and a little bent”, and apparently cannot see or hear Fairbanks at all! In a daze Fairbanks finally escapes, despite a screaming ghost, but after his recovery – a good search fails to find any trace of the road, that strange house, or the odd old man.

This is the problem that is brought to the ‘Thinking Machine’, who finally unravels the mystery. “The huge car slowed up and came to a standstill. The glittering lamps of the car showed two roads instead of one – two roads, here where there were not two roads! Hatch glared at them for a moment, then fumbled with the automobile map.
“Why, hang it! there can’t be two roads!” he declared.
“But there they are,” replied The Thinking Machine.

Not strictly a locked room or impossible crime – perhaps a locked street? However it is counted, it is still quite an impossible story and one of  Futrelle’s best!


The Haunted Bell (1906)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: An echo of the past?

“It was a thing, trivial enough, yet so strangely mystifying in its happening that the mind hesitated to accept it as an actual occurrence despite the indisputable evidence of the sense of hearing. As the seconds ticked on, Franklin Phillips was not at all certain that it had happened, and gradually the doubt began to assume the proportions of a conviction. Then, because his keenly-attuned brain did not readily explain it, the matter was dismissed as an impossibility. Certainly it had not happened. Mr. Phillips smiled a little. Of course, it was – it must be – a trick of his nerves…”

Philips was quite wrong! The gong continued to develop a life of its own, and he soon discovered that it had a long, fascinating history. Is it haunted? The ‘Thinking Machine’ is bound to find a more logical explanation!


The Brown Coat (1907)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: Mort’s run of bad luck!

There was no mystery about who robbed The Thirteenth National Bank! Mort Dolan, an expert safecracker,  had got away with $109.437! Unfortunately, at least for Mort, he had been captured within 12 hours of the robbery, but he was still sitting smug about not revealing the whereabouts of the loot, much to Detective Mallory’s helpless frustration.

Hatch finally brings the problem to the professor, who, again unfortunately for Mort, thwarts a truly ingenious scheme! This time it is really a bit hard to root for the ‘Thinking Machine’!


The Problem of the Stolen Rubens (1907) 
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

***

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: Is this really a locked room or impossible crime story?

“Matthew Kale made fifty million dollars out of axle grease, after which he began to patronize the high arts. It was simple enough: he had the money, and Europe had the old masters. His method of buying was simplicity itself. There were five thousand square yards, more or less, in the huge gallery of his marble mansion which were to be covered, so he bought five thousand square yards, more or less, of art. Some of it was good, some of it fair, and much of it bad. The chief picture of the collection was a Rubens, which he had picked up in Rome for fifty thousand dollars. “

“Another week passed, and the workmen who had been engaged in refinishing and decorating the gallery had gone. De Lesseps volunteered to assist in the work of rehanging the pictures, and Kale gladly turned the matter over to him. It was in the afternoon of the day this work began that de Lesseps, chatting pleasantly with Kale, ripped loose the canvas which enshrouded the precious Rubens. Then he paused with an exclamation of dismay. The picture was gone; the frame which had held it was empty. A thin strip of canvas around the inside edge showed that a sharp penknife had been used to cut out the painting.” Kale is certain that de Lesseps could not be involved, but the professor has his own ideas.

This story is listed as a locked room mystery in both major bibliographies and does have a rather obvious method of extracting the stolen painting from a locked and guarded gallery, so I have included it here, but I can see no clear reason for including it in any locked room or impossible crime list. At best it is a fairly intelligent heist mystery.


The Silver Box (1907)
AKA: The Leak
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: An office is bugged – before bugs were invented!

The eminent financier J. Morgan Greyson has been driven to his wits’s end by a series of leaks from his office and it has cost him several million – now he has come to the ‘Thinking Machine’ looking for answers. 

“I learned years ago that no one could keep my secrets as I do, – there are too many temptations,—therefore I never mention my plans to anyone – never – to anyone!”
“Except your stenographer,” corrected the scientist.
“I work for days, weeks, sometimes months, perfecting plans, and it’s all in my head, not on paper – not a scratch of it,” explained Grayson. “Therefore, when I say that she is in my confidence I mean that she knows my plans only half an hour or less before the machinery is put into motion. For instance, I planned this P. Q. & X. deal. My brokers didn’t know of it; Miss Winthrop never heard of it until twenty minutes before the Stock Exchange opened for business. Then I dictated to her, as I always do, some short letters of instructions to my agents. That is all she knew of it.”
“You outlined the plan in those letters?”
“No; they merely told my brokers what to do.”
“But a shrewd person, knowing the contents of all those letters, could have learned what you intended to do?”
“Yes; but no one person knew the contents of all those letters. No one broker knew what was in the other letters—many of them were unknown to each other. Miss Winthrop and I were the only two human beings who knew all that was in them.”

The detectives had already confirmed that Miss Winthrop had no opportunity to pass on any information – so how were Grayson’s plans getting to his rivals? 

Ingenious story, but once again, is this really a locked room story? Included in both of the major locked room bibliographies.


The Vanishing Man (1907)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

Best Review

****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: How can a man escape and return to a locked 4th floor office?

Charles Carroll, a wealthy businessman seems to impossibly disappear and reappear inside his fourth floor office as he chooses.  One moment he is there – the next moment he is gone – then there are all those long hours after he has entered when the sign on the door reads ‘Do not enter this room without knocking. If Mr. Carroll does not answer a knock, it is to be understood that he is not to be disturbed under any circumstances.” 


The Case of the Mysterious Weapon (1907?)
AKA: The Mystery of The Grip of Death
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

*****

Available only in paperback and ebook. See suggested collections above.

Note: One of Futrelle’s best locked room stories!

Deep silence, then a long shuddering wail of terror, a stifled, strangling cry for help, the sound of a body falling, and again deep silence. A pause, and after awhile the tramp, tramp of heavy shoes through a lower hall. A door slammed and a man staggered out into a deserted street, haggard, trembling and with lips hard set. He reeled down the street and turned the first corner, waving his trembling hands fantastically.
Another pause, and spears of light flashed through the black night from the second floor of a great six-story tenement in South Boston, then came the sound of stockinged feet hurrying along the hall. Half a dozen horror-stricken men and women gathered at the door of the room whence had come the cry, helplessly gazing into one another’s eyes, waiting, waiting, listening.
Finally, from inside the room, they heard a faint whispering sound as of wind rustling through dead leaves, or the silken swish of skirts, or the gasp of a dying man. They listened with strained attention until the noise stopped.
At last one of the men rapped on the door lightly. There was no answer, no sound. Again he rapped, this time louder; then he beat his fists on the door and called out. Still a silence that was terrifying. Mute inquiry lay in the eyes of all.
“Break in the door,” said some one at length, in an awed whisper.
“Send for the police,” said another.
The police came. They smashed in the door, old and rotting from age, and two of them entered the dark room. One of them used his lantern and those who crowded the door heard an exclamation.
“He’s dead!”
Peering curiously around the corner of the door the white-faced watchers in the hall saw a man, dressed for bed, lying still on the floor. Two chairs had been over-turned; the bed clothing was disarranged. One of the policemen was bending over the body, making a hurried examination. He finally arose.
“Strangled to death with a rope – but no rope here,” he explained to the other. “This is a case for a medical examiner and detectives.”

Newspaperman Hutchinson Hatch once again calls on the Thinking Machine, this time to shed light on the murder of a man who seems to have been strangled with a rope. The only symptoms being no air in the body and a puncture mark on the neck.


The Scarlet Thread (1907)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

No Review

****
Available in paperback, ebook, and audiobook editions.

LibriVox 

Note: More than a run of bad luck?

“Now comes the mystery of the affair,” the reporter went on. “It was five weeks or so ago Henley retired as usual—about midnight. He locked his door on the inside – he is positive of that – and awoke about four o’clock in the morning nearly asphyxiated by gas. He was barely able to get up and open the window to let in the fresh air. The gas jet he had left burning was out, and the suite was full of gas.”
“Accident, possibly,” said The Thinking Machine. “A draught through the apartments; a slight diminution of gas pressure; a hundred possibilities.”
“So it was presumed,” said the reporter. “Of course it would have been impossible for –”
“Nothing is impossible,” said the other, tartly. “Don’t say that. It annoys me exceedingly.”

Four times Weldon Henley, a young broker living in a fashionable apartment block, has barely escaped with his life, after his gas light has been extinguished in the middle of the night while he is locked inside his bedroom – and this run of bad luck only comes to an end when he is shot on Boston Common! Then a French girl, Louise Regnier, employed as a maid by Mrs. Standing in the same building, is found dead in her room on the third floor. Something very nasty appears to be haunting this modern block of apartments!


The Phantom Motor (1907)
The Thinking Machine: Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen

Best Review

****

Available in paperback, ebook, and audible editions.

Audible 

Note: A ghostly car impossibly vanishes every night!

The police, who are  lying in wait at both ends of a speed trap corridor with high walls on both sides, are baffled by a speeding automobile that appears every night – only to vanish into thin air from a road with only one other possible exit – and that far too narrow to small to allow any car to pass! Officer Baker sees it enter the corridor every night – but Officer Bowman never sees it emerge – and they are starting to mistrust each other, when Hutchinson Hatch also witnesses the car entering the trap. The next night 13 journalist line the corridor – but the car fails to appear – so Hatch turns to the ‘Thinking Machine’ for a bit of advice.


Locked Room 101: The Masters


The Locked Room Mystery home



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